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Aunt Norma's

Pantry Moths are Back Again!!

       With the weather warming up, you can expect to start seeing pantry moths again.  Often times, the eggs can go into a holding period, so to speak, from last season and not hatch again until the weather starts to warm up. Like many animals and insects, pantry moths can inherently know when spring is coming, and when it's time to start reproducing.  If you have spent the winter months moth-free, you may think that you are done with the pests forever, only to be shocked and horrified when you start seeing these pesky moths come spring.

    The best way to avoid a full-blown infestation is to get rid of them before they take hold again.  As soon as you see a moth, assume that this moth has hatched from inside the home from a leftover egg.  You should immediately check your food and make sure that it is stored in airtight glass or suction sealed containers.  I also recommend to put pantry items susceptible to pantry moth infestation (rice, flour, grains) in the freezer for awhile.  The easiest way to get a jump on a pantry moth infestation is to clean out the cupboard with Aunt Norma's Pantry Moth Spray and put out a Pantry Moth Trap.   Aunt Norma's system works by interrupting the life cycle of the moth, preventing a full-blown infestation.   


18 Comments to Pantry Moths are Back Again!!:

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FB on Thursday, March 24, 2016 4:54 PM
Hi Aunt Norma - About 8 months ago I used your spray to finally get a handle on the pantry moth problem. Yours was the last product I tried - if it hadn't worked, I think I might have considered moving to a new house. (Only half joking...) Since then I have been paranoid about returning the baking products (flour sugar etc) to their cabinet because it was such a haven for the moths. I've actually been keeping all those items (almost all are new and most in new containers) on the counters where I can keep an eye on them. But I'd like to go back to using and not fearing the cabinets. I'm 99% sure they are now moth free. I'm wondering if there are shelf liners you recommend?
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Aunt Norma on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 9:06 AM
I don't necessarily recommend shelf liners, because they create another place for pantry moth eggs & larvae to hide. One of the reasons that pantry moths are so hard to get rid of is because they eggs are so so tiny that they can be hidden in any crack, crevice or hole. The eggs then lay undetected until they hatch into larvae, which can then crawl around into even more hard to reach places. Many people seem to think that the moths are appearing as if by magic. This is why. In these situations it is hard to find the source, which is why only treating the source doesn't work. Aunt Norma's system treats all stages of the pantry moth life cycle in the whole house, so it doesn't necessarily matter if you cannot identify the exact source of the infestation. If you must use shelf liners, I recommend spraying a light mist of Aunt Norma's pantry moth spray or Kitchen Bug Spray on the bare surface first (making sure to get into cracks and crevices), allowing it to dry and THEN putting down the shelf liner. Good luck, AN


FB on Friday, March 25, 2016 9:10 AM
Having successfully gotten rid of the pantry moths with Aunt Norma's spray I'm ready to put the new stuff back in the cabinets in new containers. Aunt Norma do you have any recommendation about how to line the shelves? Anything that might attract moths that I should stay away from? Thank you so much!
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Aunt Norma on Monday, August 01, 2016 3:18 PM
You should be fine... just keep a pantry moth trap out until you haven't seen a moth in MONTHS, and make sure your food is in safe containers.


Gary on Sunday, April 10, 2016 11:46 AM
I'd like to use "Aunt Norma's Pantry Moth Spray", but I have parrots, I seen a message that said do not use around birds or exoctic animals. Can I use the spray around cracks below the cages without harming birds?? , hince not getting the spray on cages or bird food..
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Lynn on Tuesday, May 03, 2016 3:59 PM
Can the Kitchen Spray for moths be used on clothes in closets?
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CHRIS on Monday, May 23, 2016 4:33 AM
Will this spray and trap get rid of pantry beetles too? i am now seeing pantry beetles in my kitchen, i just found 2 over the weekend! they are the Larder beetles I think, they are black and rust colored. HELP! what should I do about these critters
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peggy on Wednesday, June 22, 2016 6:06 PM
A question........my infestation is in my garage. The pantry moths arrived in a bag of bird food wch unknowingly I emptied into my metal garbage pail meant for bird seed. When I lifted the lid several wks later.....they flew out and immediately were everywhere. So my ?? is do I do the same thing as the house? Move everything out of garage, use your spray, clean it all and replace??? Thanks for your response. Peggy
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Michelle on Sunday, July 10, 2016 6:23 PM
I couldn't find anywhere what essential oils are used in your non toxic sprays. Right now I'm looking at the pantry moth one but I'm also interested about the others. I have an allergy to lavender and many essential oil mixtures use it. Is it in any of your products? Vann you share which oils you use?
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Janet on Saturday, July 30, 2016 7:05 AM
What is the shelf life of the pantry moth spray?
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Aunt Norma on Saturday, July 30, 2016 6:29 PM
Since the spray is all natural, with only food-grade preservatives, it is best to order the spray when you are going to use it. It will usually last around 6 months unused, and you can tell it is going "off" by checking the color and smell.
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Aunt Norma on Monday, August 01, 2016 2:22 PM
As long as you have the food stored in safe containers, and have a pantry moth trap out somewhere nearby just to be safe, you shouldn't have to worry so much about the shelf liner. I would recommend sprinkling some Kitchen Bug Powder around if you want to be extra careful, or spritzing some Aunt Norma's Pantry Moth Spray around the outside of the cabinets every now and again to keep the scent fresh, which would repel any stary moths.
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sarah on Wednesday, November 23, 2016 8:57 AM
It seems like the moths have reappeared...? Seriously, when will they go away?
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Liz on Friday, January 06, 2017 9:35 PM
I had pantry moths in the kitchen and found the source and got rid of it. Then we found pantry moths in the garage and attic. I bought forgers and moth traps. The traps are working. I called a pest control company to come out to spray. They said we need to find the source in order to spray. My husband has looked every where but can't find the source. All of a sudden we haven't seen any moths since the weather is cooler. I'm afraid when spring comes again they we will have another infestation. Every spring my husband grows vegetables outside. Do these pests come from his garden or are they hiding somewhere in the attic or garage? How do we get rid of these moths.
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Aunt Norma on Tuesday, January 17, 2017 12:37 PM
First of all, I am so sorry for your frustration with these annoying pests. One of the main reasons that pantry moths are so notoriously difficult to get rid of is that it is often so hard to find the source. That is why Aunt Norma's works when other remedies don't: It treats the problem even if you cannot find the source, and keeps the moths from re-infesting the same area. You are on the right track with the traps. Eventually, the traps would likely work on their own- it just takes forever, and sometimes the moths can reproduce faster than the trap can stop them, and then there is a new infestation. The trick is to use the Aunt Norma's spray with the trap (Aunt Norma's Pantry Moth Kit)because the essential oils in the spray repel the moths, and keeps your food safe so that the adult moths cannot lay eggs in the food. The pantry moth traps use a pheremone lure to trap the male moths so that the reproductive cycle is inturrupted. Together, the system prevents the moths from reproducing fast enough to set up shop again and create a secondary infestation. Rearding the spring, you are right to worry. Somehow, the moths do something like a hybernation when the weather cools. Then they reappear ll of a sudden full force in the spring. The best thing you can do is to keep the scent of the spray fresh as the weather warms (spray on and around cupboads, pantry, etc.) and keep a fresh trap out. I doubt they are coming from the vegetable garden, but they are likely nesting in the garage and or attic, but don't worry to much about the source. If they are ending up in the food, you can sprinkle some diatomacious earth around or use Aunt Norma's Non-toxic Bug Powder , to kill the moth in its larvae stage, which BTW is the only stage of the moth life cycle that feeds. If you find that the moth infestation is too advanced to keep up with this way, you can try the trichogramma wasps. You can google them or read my blog post on them, I don't sell them on my site, but they are tiny, harmless predatory wasps (they don't sting or bite and are smaller than a fruitfly)that eat pantry moth eggs, so they are very effective at treating infestations where you can't find the source. Good luck, and enjoy the wonter reprieve, knowing that you will be ready for the moths should they reappear in the spring! -Aunt Norma
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Liz on Sunday, January 22, 2017 9:24 PM
Thank you for your response. I am going to purchase Aunt Norma spray and also the bug spray. I know the moths are coming from the garage or attic. Where should I spray the Aunt Norma spray and bug spray in the attic and garage ? It is cold right now in California. Should I start to spray now or in March/April when the weather gets warmer.


Hellen on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 6:43 AM
Hello, I found pantry moths in my bag of yarn I my closet. I think may have transferred by vacuuming pantry where infestation happened. Is your spray safe to use in our closet? It's in our daughters room And she is 15 months old. Thanks.
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Aunt Norma on Tuesday, August 29, 2017 1:21 PM
Hi, Hellen. Thank you for contacting me. First, I'm sorry you are dealing with these stupid moths- it's amazing where they can end up... a bag of yarn...?! (that's a new one for me, although I'm not surprised.) The first thing I would do is get rid of the yarn and clean out the closet, of course. Now regarding your question, my spray IS safe to use around infants, provided they don't have any asthma or respiratory issues. The smell of the spray is a bit strong (although smells natural, kind of a strong herbal scent), but I formulated the spray specifically to be safe to use around kids and pets. That being said, you might want to start off by trying a regular old pantrymoth trap first, if you are at all worried about the scent being too strong for your daughter. It is unlikely that there is anything left for the moths to eat in the closet once you got rid of the yarn, so you might have an easier time getting rid of an infestation than someone who found them, say, in the dogfood in the kitchen, for example. (although I urge you to to protect your food in the kitchen- the last thing you want is for these stupid moths to find their way into the pantry and set up shop there next.) You will still have to wait for the existing moths and hatchlings to die off, though- so don't panic if you don't stop seeing moths right away. The traps work by killing the males w a pheromone lure, so they can't mate. The females just die off, but the whole thing takes a couple weeks to a couple months. Good luck, and let me know if you have any more questions.

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